With or without snow?

A well informed bird told me it is some Macallan’s malt in these bottles (teaspooned), let’s try those old sherried dram. Let’s be honest a minute, that clearly the oldest Macallan’s I ever tasted and I’ll probable ever taste!

Speyside 30yo 1988-2019 (53.7%, Le Gus’t, Sherry Butt, cask #15A/105, 510 bottles)

Colour: Deep gold with ebony hues.
Nose: Buttery and creamy start, it’s round and dry with a gentle smoke veil. Nutmeg, leather, dusty books, roasted coffee beans, citruses freshness, bitter chocolate, raisins, candied plums and hints of tannins.
Mouth: The alcohol integration is perfect and the texture is very thick and oily, wrapping every part of your mouth. Bitter chocolate, marzipan, raisins, a lot of waxy notes, noble wood, cappuccino, leather, old cigar box, acacia honey, candied orange zest, old library notes, white pepper, cinnamon, roasted coffee beans and hints of cloves with a powerful citruses freshness.
Finish: Long. Leather, nutmeg, candied orange zest, bitter cocoa, noble wood adding a lot of dryness to counterbalance the initial roundness of the finish. There is also white pepper, cinnamon, citruses freshness and some delicate hints of ginger with some acidulous woody notes.

That’s clearly a wonderful old school sherried dram. This perfect alcohol integration paired with this old school dry and acidulous sherried profile is just golden! I could honestly drink that all the evening long… everyday.

Score: 91

Speyside 32yo 1988-2021 (55.3%, Le Gus’t, Sherry Butt, cask #50, 609 bottles)

Colour: Ebony with elegant copper shades.
Nose: No alcohol presence at all, you can litteraly stick your nose inside for minutes without any problems. At first smell you can already say that we are trying an old school, old sherry. It’s powerful and the profile is nicely integrated. There is a lot of citruses adding freshness, tangerines jam, , dusty leather, raisins, old library, Rapadura sugar, apricots jam, nutmeg, mushrooms and yeast that make me directly think about similarities with OBE notes! (By the way there is no real OBE here since it was just bottled months ago)
Tasted blindly I would have said that it’s an old 60/70s sherry 30yo dram, in some ways it clearly reminds me of an old Longmorn from those years.
Mouth: The alcohol integration is perfect and the texture is very thick and oily, coating every part of your gums and palate! It’s very powerful, concentrated sherry notes with a powerful citruses and pine wood freshness. White pepper, cream, noble wood, dark chocolate, acacia honey, waxy notes, apricots and tangerines jams, candied tangerine zest adding some astringence and hints of dryness to the profile, nutmeg, leather, chalk, dusty books and in the end of the mouth that typical wood acidity again paired with a nice wood freshness.
All of those are like layers slowly adding to the profile like a firework slowly growing till the finale!
Finish: Long. Noble wood, wood acidity, citruses and pine wood freshness, caramel, apricots jam, plums jam and some hints of delicate wood smoke paired with cold ashes.
It’s like being in an old kitchen where apricot and tangerine jams were been prepared in copper cauldrons on a fire.

The perfect balance between dryness, astringence, roundness, mineral notes and freshness. I can’t find any flaws and to be honest they pushed the complexity one step ahead on this one. It’s clearly one of the best release from the past years in my opinion. Hats off, can’t say anything else, good job guys as always!

Score: 92

The first bottling was already a monster, but this last one just add another layer on top of everything and that’s just crazy.
I’m really amazed by the fact that I just drank two >30yo Macallan today for just a fraction of what it’s now worth, as always Le Gus’t team is releasing an amazing product at an amazing Quality/price rating, kudos to you guys, can’t wait for the next releases!
Oh, and by the way the answer of the title question is : BOTH of course!

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